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Recognising emotions

Using technology such as biofeedback, EEG, and eye-tracking, CARG is investigating sensory processing, and a person’s ability to recognise objects, faces and emotions across their lifespan.

We’re currently running projects to develop an online emotion recognition game and identify biomarkers for emotion recognition in individuals on the autism spectrum.


Related research

Julia Tang
Julia Tang

Emotion recognition computer-based interventions in autism

PhD project

Computer-based interventions shows potential in promoting the understanding of emotion recognition skills, providing opportunities for individuals on the autism spectrum to engage within safe, structured and motivating environment.

PhD student Julia Tang’s research project aims to design and evaluate a computer-based intervention specifically for adults on the autism spectrum. In designing this intervention, the project aims to:

  • understand the emotion recognition abilities of adults on the autism spectrum
  • engage with key stakeholders, such as adults on the autism spectrum during the development of the intervention
  • evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention to target emotion recognition skills, in particular its efficacy to demonstrate the improvement of skills to everyday environments.

More information

Email: julia.tang@postgrad.curtin.edu.au


Melissa Black
Melissa Black

Identifying biomarkers for emotion recognition in autism

PhD project

Recognising emotions in others is a core difficulty for individuals on the autism spectrum. Melissa Black’s PhD project seeks to understand the underlying mechanisms contributing to the difficulties that adults on the autism spectrum have when recognising emotions.

Specifically, we are interested in identifying gaze and neural biomarkers of emotion recognition using eye tracking and electroencephalography. We have a particular focus on using ecologically valid and naturalistic stimuli to capture the ‘real-life’ nature of emotion processing in individuals on the autism spectrum.

The identification of these biomarkers can have significant clinical utility as potential diagnostic and predictive markers for treatment and we are currently investigating how these biomarkers can be influenced through intervention.

More information

Email: melissa.black@curtin.edu.au